Have you noticed pain or discomfort whenever you eat something cold, hot, or sweet? If so, you’re not the only one. Many people suffer from tooth sensitivity but choose not to treat it because they think it will go away on its own, however, this is not always the case. 

Have you noticed pain or discomfort whenever you eat something cold, hot, or sweet? If so, you’re not the only one. Many people suffer from tooth sensitivity but choose not to treat it because they think it will go away on its own, however, this is not always the case. 

Tooth sensitivity (dentin hypersensitivity) happens because of the exposure of dentin on the root areas due to periodontal disease or receding gums. Tooth sensitivity is a common complaint that many patients mention during their oral exam. It can happen due to many reasons like eating acidic foods, brushing too hard, or tooth decay. It is important to mention any sensitivity you may feel in order for your dentist to help you choose the best possible treatment for you. 

People may experience discomfort in response to certain triggers. The most common signs of sensitive teeth may include sensitivity to:

  • Sweet food and beverages
  • Acidic foods
  • Hot food and beverages
  • Cold food and beverages
  •  Brushing or flossing
  • Cold air
  •  Certain mouth rinses with alcohol in it. 

 

Some people may have sensitive teeth by nature due to their enamel being thinner. Other cases, the tooth enamel may be worn down from brushing your teeth using a hard toothbrush or simply brushing too hard. Grinding your teeth may also play a part in tooth sensitivity. Receding gums, broken teeth, tooth decay, and aging fillings or crowns can also cause sensitivity to your teeth. 

Dr. Tyler may suggest using over the counter dental treatments for mild cases. He may also recommend using a soft bristle toothbrush and an alcohol-free mouth rinse. Using tooth paste designed specifically for tooth sensitivity will help ease your discomfort. If home treatments are not working, Dr. Tyler may prescribe you a toothpaste and mouthwash or treat it with prescription-grade desensitizing agents in office. 

 

If you notice a sharp or uncomfortable pain that happens when you perform different tasks like eating, drinking, or breathing in air, please give us a call at (772)286-1606 and one of our specialists will be more than happy to schedule you an appointment.